Frequently Asked Questions

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Who makes up the OMC?

  • We are upper-year law students at Osgoode Hall Law School who are trained as qualified mediators and are currently enrolled in the Mediation Intensive Clinical Program. Our work is supervised by the Clinic Director, Professor Martha Simmons.

How long has the OMC been operational?

  • The OMC began in 2006 as a project for law students to develop mediation skills while giving back to the community by providing free mediation services. A more formalized clinic and outreach programs began in 2009.

Does the OMC provide legal advice?

Is mediation confidential?

  • Yes, it is a completely confidential process. What is said in mediation cannot be used in court, and cannot be shared without the permission of the party or parties. By keeping mediation confidential, parties are free to express their thoughts and concerns to reach the best possible solution.

Do you collaborate with community organizations?

  • Yes, in order to better serve our community, we partner with many organizations and tailor our services to meet their needs.

How long are the seminars or the sessions for conflict coaching?

  • Seminars and conflict coaching sessions typically run for 30 minutes. Additional conflict coaching session can be scheduled as desired.

What is the role of the conflict coach?

  • The role of the conflict coach is multi-faceted: consultant, trainer, advisor and motivator. The coach’s responsibility is to elicit client-generated solutions and strategies.

How long are the mediation sessions?

  • Since the process is guided by the participants themselves, and is issue dependent, the process will take as long as the parties need to resolve the conflict or to come to an understanding. In general, our individual sessions last approximately 3 hours. Additional mediation session can be scheduled as desired.

What is the role of the mediator?

  • The role of the mediator is to facilitate the conflict resolution process in order to reach a mutually beneficial and satisfying outcome for both parties. The mediator maintains the role of a neutral third-party with no bias or prejudice to either of the parties. While the parties determine the majority of the mediation process, the mediator can intervene to enforce basic rules, such as stopping interruptions or disrespectful conduct to ensure the parties are heard.

What are the steps of the mediation process?

  • Intake session: one-on-one session between the mediator and the disputant.
  • Pre-mediation meeting with both parties (separately).
  • Mediation.
  • Memorandum of Understanding (a written record of the agreement) is created for the parties if an agreement is reached.
  • Three-month follow-up.

What is Collaborative Practice?

  • A safe and private way for couples, supported by trained professionals, to resolve separation issues without going to court.

How do I get involved with the Pro Bono Collaborative Family Law Project?

Visit the Pro Bono Collaborative Family Law Project website to review the program. Both spouses must attend for separate intake meetings.

How do I find out if I am eligible for the Pro Bono Collaborative Family Law Project?

Visit the Pro Bono Collaborative Family Law Project website for eligibility requirements.

If you have any further questions, please contact us.