Program and Eligibility Requirements

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Advanced Business Law Workshop I: Corporate Finance

DIRECTORS Adjunct Professor Carol Pennycook
CREDITS 5
SEMESTER Fall
LOCATION Davies Ward Phillips & Vineberg LLP
SEMINAR Weekly
REQUIRED COURSES Business Associations, Securities Regulation (may be taken concurrently)
RECOMMENDED Tax of Business Enterprises, Commercial Law
YEAR OF STUDY 2L and 3L
PROGRAM SIZE 16 students
PRAXICUM No
WRITING REQUIREMENT No
OPIR No
EVALUATION Three graded assignments and class participation

The Program

The Advanced Corporate Finance Workshop draws together various aspects of corporate and securities law and applies that knowledge to analyzing the problems that confront a business lawyer involved in the public and private debt and equity markets.

Through an interactive workshop format, students will gain insights into the practical aspects of structuring, negotiating, and executing corporate finance transactions.  Students will gain familiarity with the relevant principal documents and processes by participating in exercises and completing assignments that emphasize practice skills and strategic considerations.  Students will also develop insight into the broader theoretical and ethical considerations that confront a business lawyer.

The class meets weekly for a three-hour session at the offices of Davies Ward Phillips & Vineberg LLP in downtown Toronto.  Topics may include:

  • Equity offerings in the capital markets — public offerings and private placements of common and preferred shares, subscription receipts and structured products
  • Bank financings — secured and unsecured
  • Debt offerings in the capital markets — public offerings and private placements of bonds, debentures, medium term notes and commercial paper
  • Roles of rating agencies and investment dealers in corporate finance
  • Public-private partnerships (P3s)
  • Insolvency and restructuring
  • How to run a deal — due diligence to closing

Students may apply to take one or both Advanced Business Law Workshops.  ABLW I: Corporate Finance is offered in the Fall term and ABLW II: Mergers & Acquisitions is offered in the Winter term.  Demonstrated academic performance based on law school grades to date will be an important selection factor.

Applications

Grade Report Resume/CV Cover Letter Writing Sample References Prerequisites
Y Y N N N Y

Advanced Business Law Workshop II: Mergers & Acquisitions 

DIRECTORS Adjunct Professor Patricia Olasker
CREDITS 5
SEMESTER Winter
LOCATION Davies Ward Phillips & Vineberg LLP
SEMINAR Weekly
REQUIRED COURSES Securities Regulation and Business Associations (Business Associations may be taken concurrently with special permission; however, completion of Securities Regulation is required)
RECOMMENDED Taxation Law, Taxation of Business Enterprises
YEAR OF STUDY 2L and 3L
PROGRAM SIZE 16 students
PRAXICUM Yes
UPPER YEAR WRITING REQUIREMENT No
OPIR No
EVALUATION Three graded assignments and class participation, credit/no-credit reflection

The Program

The Advanced Mergers and Acquisitions Workshop draws together various aspects of securities and corporate law under the broad title of “M&A” and applies that knowledge to analyzing typical problems that confront business lawyers involved in M&A transactions.  Through an interactive workshop format, students will gain insights into the practical aspects of structuring, negotiating and executing M&A transactions.  In addition to being able to analyze and apply relevant corporate and securities law principles, students will learn to identify and understand applicable tax, competition and foreign investment issues.  Students will gain familiarity with the relevant principal documents and processes involved in M&A transactions by participating in exercises and games and completing assignments that emphasize practical skills and strategic considerations.  Students will have the opportunity to develop their negotiation and presentation skills. They will learn about M&A transactions, not only from a legal perspective, but also from the perspective of securities regulators and investment bankers through the participation of guest speakers.

The class meets weekly for a three-hour session at the offices of Davies Ward Phillips & Vineberg LLP in downtown Toronto.  The workshop will focus on public companies, and topics will include:

  • Acquisition alternatives (including take-over bids, plans of arrangement and amalgamations)
  • Business combinations, related party transactions, issuer bids and insider bids
  • Cross border transactions
  • Negotiated acquisitions, including key negotiating issues and strategies
  • Directors’ considerations in going private transactions
  • Hostile acquisitions
  • Proxy contests and shareholder activism
  • Current regulatory issues in M&A
  • Tax, foreign investment and competition law aspects of M&A

Students may apply to take one or both Advanced Business Law Workshops.  ABLW I: Corporate Finance is offered in the Fall term, and ABLW II: Mergers & Acquisitions is offered in the Winter term.  Demonstrated academic performance based on law school grades to date will be an important selection factor.

Applications

Grade Report Resume/CV Cover Letter Writing Sample References Prerequisites
Y Y N N N Y

Anti-Discrimination Intensive Program 

DIRECTORS Professor Bruce Ryder and Roger Love
CREDITS 15
SEMESTER Full Year
LOCATION Human Rights Legal Support Centre
SEMINAR Roughly bi-weekly
REQUIRED COURSES None
RECOMMENDED COURSES Administrative Law, Discrimination and the Law, Disability and the Law, Labour and Employment Law (may be taken concurrently)
YEAR OF STUDY 2L and 3L
PROGRAM SIZE 12 students
PRAXICUM Yes
UPPER YEAR WRITING REQUIREMENT Yes
OPIR Yes
EVALUATION Graded seminar (2 credits) and research paper (3 credits), credit/no-credit clinical work (10 credits), written evaluation attached to transcript

The Program

The Anti-Discrimination Program is an exciting collaboration between Osgoode and the Human Rights Legal Support Centre.  The Centre was established in 2008 and has 25 lawyers who work in a team environment to provide summary legal advice and representation at mediations and hearings to applicants before the Tribunal.  Students contribute to promoting access to justice by enhancing the ability of the Centre to provide legal services to those who have experienced discrimination across the province.  Students also develop specialized knowledge of anti-discrimination and administrative law, and hone skills in client counselling, dispute resolution and litigation.  The Program consists of a placement at the Centre, an academic seminar, and a research paper.

The placement (in either the Fall or Winter term) begins with intensive orientation training in the first week of the semester.  During their placements, students work four or five days a week at the Centre in downtown Toronto.  Students participate in the Centre’s public inquiries service and are responsible for conducting detailed legal interviews on files that are referred from intake.  In addition, students draft legal documents, partner with Centre lawyers at mediation, and on files scheduled for hearing by the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario.  Each student is assigned a personal lawyer mentor.  Skills-based training continues at the Centre on alternate Friday afternoons throughout the academic year for students doing both Fall and Winter placements.

Seminar meetings are every other Friday, commencing in September and continuing until April.  In the seminar, students develop perspectives from which to understand, critically assess and think constructively about prohibitions on discrimination and their impact on society and the challenges of ensuring access to remedies for violations of fundamental rights experienced by disadvantaged communities.  Students complete a research paper under the supervision of the Program Director which reflects their learning in the seminar and their experience in the placement.

For further information on the Centre, please visit their website..

Applications

Grade Report Resume/CV Cover Letter Writing Sample References Prerequisites
Y Y Y N N N

Community And Legal Aid Services Program (CLASP) 

DIRECTOR Adjunct Professor Suzanne Johnson
CREDITS 15
SEMESTER Full Year
LOCATION Osgoode Hall Law School
SEMINAR Roughly bi-weekly
REQUIRED COURSES Family Law for students in Family Law Division (can be taken concurrently)
RECOMMENDED Evidence (can be taken concurrently)
YEAR OF STUDY 2L and 3L
PROGRAM SIZE 23 students
PRAXICUM Yes
UPPER YEAR WRITING REQUIREMENT Yes
OPIR Yes
EVALUATION Graded seminar (3 credits) and research paper (3 credits), credit/no-credit clinic work (9 credits), written evaluation attached to transcript

The Program

The Community and Legal Aid Services Program (CLASP) provides a combination of individual advocacy, community development, and law reform to low income individuals and families.  CLASP prioritizes service to four disadvantaged communities that have been historically denied meaningful access to the legal system: persons living with mental health barriers, youth, female survivors of domestic violence, and members of the Jane-Finch community.  CLASP’s individual representation work is directed to low-income persons, including York University students, not eligible for a legal aid certificate.  Law students who participate in CLASP will be able to bring alternative lawyering skills and a social justice perspective to their future work.

CLASP’s service provision model relies on law student Division Leaders who work in the clinic under the supervision of five lawyers and one outreach coordinator.  In addition to file work, Division Leaders participate in law reform, community development, and public legal education initiatives.  These students also facilitate the involvement of approximately 150 – 200 volunteer law students who work with real clients in a variety of roles – from the initial intake interviews, to researching and preparing a file for trial, to representing clients in court or at a tribunal.  CLASP enables students to get a true taste of what it’s like to practice law.

Division Leaders begin in May as paid caseworkers for the summer and work for credit during the academic year.  Throughout the year they attend required supervision meetings (integrating feedback and case reflection), provide training guidance to other volunteer students (both as intake volunteers and caseworkers), advance a case load (including files and summary advice) in accordance with the standards of the supervision policy and related standards, oversee intake volunteers at our main location, coordinate and staff our satellite locations, and pursue law reform, public legal education and community development projects.  CLASP provides an opportunity for law students to gain experience and skills in community-based lawyering, client relations, professional responsibility, and advocacy, as well as exposure to the legal and social needs of Toronto’s varied low-income community.

Administrative Law Division

The Administrative Law Division uniquely allows you to work within a variety of legal areas – Landlord and Tenant, Human Rights, Ontario Disability Support, Criminal Injury Compensation Applications, and Academic Appeals.  Students will gain invaluable experience preparing opening submissions, direct and cross-examinations, as well as representing clients before quasi-judicial boards and tribunals.

Criminal Division

CLASP primarily assists those charged in the Ontario Court of Justice with summary conviction offences.  As a Division Leader, you will be representing clients in all stages of their case, from a first appearance through to trial.  In addition to the criminal defence work, the Criminal Division also assists clients with obtaining record suspensions (pardons) and suppression of mental health records.  All criminal division leaders volunteer at the 1000 Finch Courthouse and Scarborough duty counsel office, assisting with bail and surety interviews, and answering questions from unrepresented defendants.

Immigration Law Division

The Immigration Law Division affords students the opportunity to represent clients before the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada, Refugee Protection Division as well as the Immigration Appeal Division.  Students will gain experience doing hearings for refugee protection, humanitarian and compassionate grounds applications, criminal inadmissibility hearings, as well as legal research and writing for judicial reviews and legal and constitutional challenges.

Family Law Division

Students in the Family Law Division provides assistance to people who are involved in Family Court cases as well as those who are seeking negotiated resolutions. Family Law Division assists people representing themselves in Family Court by completing their documents, helping them to navigate the Family Court process and referring them to other family justice resources. Students will have the opportunity to work on child custody, child access, child support, spousal support, restraining orders, separation agreements, parenting plans, and uncontested divorces.  The Family Law Division also provides representation in the Ontario Court of Justice for those litigants who are not capable of self-representation.

Benefits:

Division Leaders are responsible for all aspects of a file from start to finish. Division Leaders gain practical experience; legal knowledge; critical analysis and reflection skills; diverse communication skills (both verbal and written); formal and informal advocacy skills; community lawyering skills; community development skills and experience working collaboratively and in groups. Division leaders will also gain invaluable experience in case file work (initial interviews, opinion letters, submissions, hearing/trial preparation, hearing/trial advocacy, file closing); client management; building relationships; community activism; the provision of holistic client services and will become members of a long legacy of CLASP alumni.

Requirements:

Applicants must:

  • Be currently enrolled in 1st or 2nd year and be in good academic standing.
  • Not be enrolled in any other intensive program or exchange program during the academic year when you are enrolled in CLASP.
  • Students accepted into the Family Law Division MUST enroll and complete one course in Family Law at Osgoode during the upcoming academic year (preferably the Fall Term). All students are strongly encouraged to take Evidence Law while at CLASP.
  • Attend and fully participate in the clinic training held during the first two weeks of May. Students will not be allowed to take vacation during the month of May. Students should speak with their Review Counsel before planning vacation time to ensure that hearings and limitation dates are covered. In addition, students are discouraged from taking vacation in the early weeks of June as the learning curve is very high.
  • Participate in the paid summer term at CLASP on a full-time basis during regular business hours (some flex time available for evening and weekend hours).
  • Operate under the supervision of Review Counsel, the Clinic Director and the Community Outreach Counsellor.
  • Participate in the clinic throughout the academic year by:
    • Maintaining 5 fixed office hours/week during regular business hours spread out over 3 days
    • Supervising Intake Volunteers 3 hours per week plus one additional 3-hour shift per month
    • Supervising Caseworkers throughout the year
    • Participating in general CLASP activities
    • Maintaining an appropriate level of case files and community outreach work as determined by CLASP
    • Attending at one of the CLASP satellite clinics
    • Attending at duty counsel shadowing
    • Conducting thorough file transfers with the outgoing Division Leaders in March and April

Expectations:

Work Load of Division Leaders

  • Division Leaders will be required to be in the CLASP offices (office hours and Intake Volunteer supervision) 7-8 hours per week. It is most certain that your file and community engagement work will require that you engage in CLASP work for a significant amount of time in addition to the required hours. Clinical Intensive programs generally require a greater time commitment than more traditional classroom courses.
  • When preparing for trial, hearing, written submissions or community outreach activities it is not unusual for students to spend additional hours at the clinic (on top of the required hours). Depending on the complexity of the work, students’ knowledge, and other factors this could represent an additional 20 hours in any given week.
  • During the Fall and Winter Reading week students are not expected to be at the clinic and students will work with their Review Counsel/Community Outreach Councillor/Clinic Director to organize work to allow students to be away from their clinic work. In rare circumstances students might have to do some work on a file (particularly if there is an upcoming trial or hearing), however, this will be discussed and negotiated on a case-by-case basis.
  • Beginning one week before the exam period the clinic is closed for new intakes. Students in conjunction with their Review Counsel/Community Outreach Councillor will prioritize the file/outreach work so that work on files is not necessary or required during the exam period. During this period Review Counsel/Community Outreach Councillor will monitor files and will only contact students in extremely rare circumstances if clarification is required. CLASP is respectful of the exam period and students’ need to study and concentrate during this time.

Division Leaders are expected to:

  • Be available for, and actively participate in, regular division specific and clinic wide meetings and trainings throughout the year
  • Be respectful, ethical, professional, open minded, collegial and to abide by all clinic policies, including the positive space policy
  • Be interested in and further the goals of the clinic
  • Be able to work independently and collectively
  • Seek out supervision and be responsive to supervision
  • Be able to function in a dynamic and changing environment
  • Participate in community engagement activities
  • Participate in duty counsel shadowing
  • Participate in other clinical initiatives as needed
  • Maintain an appropriate case file and community outreach workload

How to Apply:

To apply for the program, you must submit:

  • A completed application form (make sure to include the names of Division Leaders you have worked with)
  • A cover letter outlining:
    • Why you are interested in becoming a Division Leader
    • What skills or assets you bring to the position
    • What you hope to gain from the clinical experience
  • Your résumé
  • The names and contact information of two references

Selection Process:

CLASP looks at a number of criteria in its selection of Division Leaders, including previous experience at CLASP (including discussions with Counsel, staff and Division Leaders you may have worked with at CLASP), relevant experience outside of CLASP, references from third parties, demonstrated commitment to the objectives of the clinic, interest in working with marginalized communities, ability to work with others, ability to interact with clients of the clinic in a respectful and professional manner, organizational skills, time management skills, and ability to motivate and train other students. Experience as a caseworker or Intake Volunteer is an asset, but not necessary to apply. The Hiring Committee reviews applications and conducts interviews. Due to the anticipated volume of applications, not all applicants may be selected for an interview. Applicants who are selected for an interview will receive an email with instructions about how and when to sign up for interviews.  Interviews will be held in February. Following interviews, the Hiring Committee selects the individuals to whom Division Leader positions will be offered. Second interviews may be requested. All information provided during the interview and hiring process is confidential. Offers will be made by e-mail through the Office of Experiential Education. Please consult with the Office of Experiential Education for more detailed information on the offer and acceptance process.

APPLICATIONS

Grade Report Resume/CV Statement of Interest Writing Sample References Prerequisites
Y Y Y N Y Y

Disability Law Intensive

DIRECTOR Professor Roxanne Mykitiuk
CREDITS 15
SEMESTER Full Year
LOCATION ARCH Disability Law Centre
SEMINAR Bi-weekly
REQUIRED COURSES Disability and the Law (can be taken concurrently)
YEAR OF STUDY 2L and 3L
PROGRAM SIZE 12 students
PRAXICUM Yes
UPPER YEAR WRITING REQUIREMENT Yes
OPIR Yes
EVALUATION Graded seminar (2 credits) and research paper (3 credits), credit/no-credit clinical work (10 credits), written evaluation attached to transcript

The Program

The Disability Law Intensive (DLI) is a unique opportunity for students at Osgoode Hall Law School to engage in the practice and study of disability law.  This innovative Program combines Osgoode’s expertise in disability law with the experience and knowledge of ARCH Disability Law Center, an internationally recognized leader in disability law.  Students will learn about the scope of disability law through involvement in individual client advocacy, community education, and systemic law and policy-based reform and advocacy.

The seminar will begin in September and be held approximately every other week.  The seminar will encourage students to be aware of their own way of thinking that will challenge assumptions about people with disabilities.  The seminar will also critically examine how people with disabilities have been portrayed through different disability theories, the consequences and impact of ableism and sanism, the role of the law (and lawyers), administrative decisions, and governmental policies, and the intersectionality of disability and poverty.

Students are placed at ARCH on a part time basis throughout the Fall and Winter semesters.  Unique to this Program, students will spend one semester focusing exclusively on traditional client advocacy and the other semester on systemic law and policy reform, which ARCH undertakes in partnership with disability organizations throughout Ontario.  This division will allow students to concentrate on two very different but connected forms of disability related advocacy.  In the past, students have had the opportunity to work on Supreme Court of Canada interventions, Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario applications and mediations, class actions, and test case litigation.  By merging theory and practice, students will gain insight into real issues that are faced by people with disabilities.

Students enrolled in the Program have a demonstrated commitment to social justice and to the eradication of barriers facing people with disabilities and embrace the understanding of social and rights-based models of disability.  The Program encourages critique and reflection.

For more information, visit ARCH Disability Law Centre’s website: http://www.archdisabilitylaw.ca/

Requirements

Applicants must:

  • Currently be enrolled in 1st or 2nd year and be in good academic standing
  • Not be enrolled in any other intensive program, or in an exchange program during the academic year they wish to participate in the DLI program.
  • Attend and fully participate in skills/orientation training
  • Operate under the supervision of the Clinic Director, ARCH lawyers and staff
  • Participate in the clinic throughout the academic year by being physically present at the ARCH office 2 days a week and being available to complete other work outside office hours as needed
  • Maintain an appropriate level of case files and/or systemic law reform and policy work as determined by the Director and ARCH, and conduct thorough file transfers at the end of the Winter Term (as needed)
  • There is a pre/co-requisite: Disability and the Law

Expectations

  • You will be required to be in the ARCH offices 2 days a week. At times you may be required to work on ARCH related work beyond the 2 days you are placed at the clinic. Clinical Intensive programs generally require more of a time commitment than more traditional in-classroom courses.
  • During the Fall and Winter Reading week students are not expected to be at ARCH and students will work with the ARCH lawyers and the Clinic Director to organize the work to allow students to be away from their clinic work. In rare circumstances students might have to do some work on a file (particularly if there is an upcoming trial or hearing) however this will be discussed and negotiated on a case-by-case basis.
  • Students will not be expected to be at the ARCH offices during the exam period. The work will be organized so as to allow students the time to study and concentrate during that time. In extremely rare circumstances students may be contacted during this period in order to seek clarification on work however, the ARCH staff will be mindful of the students’ other commitments during this period

You will also be expected to:

  • Be respectful, ethical, professional, open minded, collegial and abide by all clinic policies, including the positive space policy
  • Be interested in and further the goals of the clinic
  • Be able to work independently and collectively
  • Seek out supervision and be responsive to supervision
  • Be able to function in a dynamic and changing environment

Selection Process

  • The DLI program will follow the recruitment process for the selection of students as determined by the Clinical Education Committee.
  • Generally, the selection process begins in late January for a placement in the following academic year.
  • The DLI program process for selection of students will usually require a short interview with the Director and members of the ARCH staff.
  • Depending on the volume of applications we may not be able to interview all applicants
  • Those selected for an interview will be emailed shortly after the close of the application process to schedule an interview time
  • The interviews will be approximately 20 minutes in length with standard questions asked of each student.

In selecting students the DLI program will consider a number of factors including: knowledge of or experience with disability issues, interest in the disability field, ability for self reflection and self critique, ability to function in a dynamic and developing clinical environment, commitment to social justice and access to justice for people with disabilities and those living in poverty, interest in larger systemic policy issues that face people with disabilities and those living in poverty.

Applications

Grade Report Resume/CV Cover Letter Writing Sample References Prerequisites
Y Y Y Y Y Y

Environmental Justice and Sustainability Clinical Program

DIRECTORS Professor Dayna Scott and Professor Estair Van Wagner
CREDITS 15
SEMESTER Full Year
LOCATION Osgoode Hall Law School
SEMINAR Roughly bi-weekly
REQUIRED COURSES At least one of Environmental Law, Land Use Planning, or Municipal Law
YEAR OF STUDY 2L and 3L
PROGRAM SIZE 15 students
PRAXICUM Yes
UPPER YEAR WRITING REQUIREMENT Yes
OPIR Yes
EVALUATION Graded seminar component (3 credits) and research component (3 credits), credit/no-credit clinical work (9 credits), written evaluation attached to transcript

The Program

The Environmental Justice and Sustainability (EJS) Clinic is a public interest legal clinic and experiential education initiative housed at Osgoode Hall Law School.  We work to advance environmental justice and sustainability in Canada by carrying out a variety of legal work on a pro bono basis.

“Environmental justice” mobilizes environmental, civil rights, anti-racist, anti-poverty, indigenous rights and feminist agendas to challenge the unequal distribution of environmental burdens and benefits in society.  “Sustainability” involves the simultaneous pursuit of ecological integrity, social equity and economic prosperity within the biophysical constraints of local and planetary ecosystems.  This dual mandate encompasses a broad range of subject-matter, including biodiversity, energy, water, food, climate change, pollution, resource extraction, land use planning, human rights, green-technology, social enterprise, corporate social responsibility, toxic torts, and regulatory compliance.  It also includes a variety of types of legal work, including litigation, law reform, legislative drafting, community legal education and outreach, and business law services that advance sustainable or social enterprise.

The EJS Clinical Program does a range of legal work (litigation, law reform, legal education, legal drafting, etc.) for a variety of clients, in cooperation with external organizations.  Files are selected for their likely lasting positive impact on environmental justice and sustainability.  Clients may include individuals, community groups, public interest non-governmental organizations, Indigenous organizations, First Nations, municipalities, cooperatives, social enterprises and other groups affected by environmental injustice or interested in advancing sustainability.  The Program may also work in its own name (e.g.  legal education materials or law reform submissions).  Past students have worked on issues including environmental assessment reform, climate change litigation and risk disclosure, cumulative effects assessment for air emissions, First Nations environmental governance, asbestos, toxics regulation, endangered species and conservation, and pollution warning labels on gas pumps.

Additionally, the EJS Clinical Program Seminar meets biweekly throughout the academic year.  In the seminar, students explore and develop perspectives from which to understand, critically assess, and think constructively about environmental justice, sustainability, and public interest lawyering.  Students will receive clinical skills training and an education in environmental justice, sustainability, and public interest lawyering.  Some Seminar meetings will feature guest lectures, panels or short field trips.  Students will also be required to complete a legal research paper or project that complements their clinical work.

Past Placements

  • Canadian Environmental Law Association
  • East Coast Environmental Law Association
  • Ecojustice
  • City of Toronto
  • Greenpeace Canada
  • Lake Ontario Waterkeeper
  • Our Horizon
  • Sagamok Anishnawbek First Nation
  • West Coast Environmental Law
  • Human Rights Watch

To learn more visit their website or follow them on Twitter

Clinical work (9 credits, credit/no credit)

Students are placed virtually with an external lawyer or law office for most or all of their clinical work. Students receive their file assignments early in the Fall term, after an initial introduction (see Seminar, below). They do 15-20 hours of clinical work per week throughout the remainder of the academic year, with the exception of reading weeks, exam periods and holidays. The nature and timing of clinical work is determined on an individual basis depending on the file. The clinical work finishes a few weeks before the end of Winter term classes, to allow for orderly wrap‐up of the seminar and research assignment. Academic credit for the clinical work is awarded on a credit/no credit basis, with 4 credits allocated to the Fall term and 5 credits to the Winter term. The credits are awarded upon completion of the entire program (until then they appear as “in progress” on transcripts). Students receive a combination of informal feedback and formal evaluation. They receive informal feedback through supervisory discussions and comments on written work. They also receive an interim written evaluation from their supervising lawyer(s) and the directors early in the Winter term. They receive a final written evaluation that encompasses their clinical work in both terms. The final evaluation is completed by the academic directors at the end of the academic year with input from the supervising lawyer(s). Blank written evaluation forms are available to students in advance.

To facilitate the praxicum component, students keep a reflective journal in which they reflect on their engagement with theory and practice. Students receive formative feedback on journals, but the journals do not form part of the summative evaluation.

Seminar (3 credits, graded)

The EJS Clinical Program Seminar meets approximately biweekly throughout the academic year. In the seminar, students explore and develop perspectives from which to understand, critically assess, and think constructively about environmental justice, sustainability, and public interest lawyering. The seminar meets a total of fourteen times throughout the year. The first few meetings are devoted to orientation, clinical skills training and an introduction to environmental justice, sustainability, and public interest law. The last couple meetings are devoted to collective reflection designed to integrate theory and practice. The intervening seminar meetings are devoted to special topics in environmental justice and sustainability and to some skills development. Some seminars may feature guest speakers or short field trips.

Each student is responsible for facilitating discussion at one seminar meeting.

Early in the Winter term, students give an in‐class presentation of their research project.

The breakdown of the seminar grade is: 33⅓% participation, 33⅓% leadership of one seminar meeting, and 33⅓% student presentation. The credits for the seminar are allocated to the Fall term and are awarded upon completion of the program (until then they appear as “in progress” on transcripts).

Research assignment (3 credits, graded)

Students are required to complete a legal research paper or project that complements but does not duplicate their clinical work and does not compromise client confidentiality. Topics are approved by the directors no later than the end of November. Students submit a research proposal (2‐3 pages), on which they receive formative feedback. The research paper must be at least 7,000 words and qualifies for the Osgoode writing requirement. Projects other than research papers (e.g. public legal education materials, film, or law reform proposal) may or may not satisfy the writing requirement, depending on their format and length. The paper or project is due on the general due date for Winter term seminar papers.

Students must also post an entry on the clinic’s blog. The blog post (up to 750 words) may be about the student’s research project or another topic related to environmental justice and sustainability. Draft blog posts are due late in the Fall term.

The breakdown of the research assignment grade is 20% blog post and 80% research paper or project. The credits for the research assignment are allocated to the Winter term.

Eligibility and Requirements

Applicants must:

  • Be entering the second or third year of the JD
  • Have completed or be enrolled in at least one of Environmental Law, Land Use Planning Law, or Municipal Law by the Fall term of the year in which they enrol in the EJS Clinical
  • Not be enrolled in any other intensive program or in any exchange program during the academic year in which they wish to participate in the EJS Clinical

The number of places available depends partly on the nature and number of projects available but is expected to be between 8 and 12. Students may complete the program only once. In the event of oversubscription, preference is given to third‐year students.

Applications

Grade Report Resume/CV Statement of Interest Writing Sample References Prerequisites
Y Y Y N N Y

Feminist Advocacy: Ending Violence Against Women Clinical Program 

DIRECTORS Professor Janet Mosher and Adjunct Professor Deepa Mattoo
CREDITS 9
SEMESTER Full year
LOCATION Osgoode Hall Law School and the Barbra Schlifer Commemorative Clinic
SEMINAR Roughly bi-weekly
REQUIRED COURSES None
YEAR OF STUDY 2L and 3L
PROGRAM SIZE 12
PRAXICUM Yes
UPPER YEAR WRITING REQUIREMENT Yes
OPIR Yes
EVALUATION Graded seminar (3 credits) evaluated by a 7,000-word paper (75%) and participation (25%), credit/no-credit clinical work (6 credits), written evaluation attached to transcript

The Program

The Feminist Advocacy Clinical Program seeks to respond to the need for high-quality legal representation of women who have experienced violence and to facilitate students’ acquisition of the specialized knowledge, skills, and value base required for such representation.  The Program is situated within a framework of “feminist advocacy,” inviting reflections on what feminism might mean for how we think about lawyering, legal ethics, and access to justice.

Through a partnership between Osgoode Hall Law School and the Barbra Schlifer Commemorative Clinic, students spend approximately 7 hours/week throughout the year at the clinic and approximately 2 hours/week on clinic projects. To prepare students for the clinical work, intensive orientation workshops (6-8 hours in total) are held early in the fall.  In addition to these hours, the program includes “site visits” (approximately 6 hours/semester), as well as “case rounds” (approximately 4 hours/semester) that are designed to deepen the connections between theory and practice. The visits and rounds are usually scheduled on Fridays, where possible either before or after the regular seminar meeting time. The seminar has roughly 13 scheduled meetings over the fall and winter semesters. The seminar frequently meets at the Schlifer Clinic (Bathurst and College) to accommodate participation by clinic staff and feminist advocates invited as guests.

Students participating in the Program are integrated into the work of the clinic, and while the precise contours of the work vary from student-to-student, it includes a combination of legal intake shifts, follow-up legal support to clients, and work on case files in family and immigration law. The program exposes students to the complexities of addressing access to justice for women-identified survivors of violence in various legal domains (family, child welfare, immigration, social assistance, criminal law), as well as when these legal domains intersect; to an approach to practice that challenges disciplinary boundaries; and to a trauma-informed, anti-oppressive legal practice. The seminar draws from examples of feminist advocacy in action to critically examine the connections between our work with individuals and the structures of power that create and sustain inequality and oppression and to critically assess the transformative potential of law and its capacity to meaningfully address gender-based violence.

Applications

Grade Report Resume/CV Cover Letter Writing Sample References Prerequisites
Y Y N N N N

Written applications will be reviewed by Program Directors to generate a shortlist of applicants for interviews.  Those students selected for interviews will be contact directly to arrange an interview time.

Innocence Project 

DIRECTOR Adjunct Professor Bhavandeep K. Sodhi
CREDITS 9
SEMESTER Full Year
LOCATION Osgoode Hall Law School
SEMINAR Regular workshops throughout the year
REQUIRED COURSES Forensic Science and the Law (students attend but need not enroll)
YEAR OF STUDY 2L and 3L
PROGRAM SIZE 8-10 students
PRAXICUM Yes
UPPER YEAR WRITING REQUIREMENT Yes
OPIR Yes
EVALUATION Graded research project (3 credits), credit/no-credit clinical work (6 credits), written evaluation attached to transcript

The Program

Students enrolled in the Innocence Project have literally changed lives in the pursuit of justice for the wrongfully convicted. Under the supervision of the director, students enrolled in the Innocence Project examine cases of suspected wrongful conviction and where feasible, reinvestigate and seek proof of their innocence.

The conviction of the innocent offends justice in a number of ways and ultimately weakens the public faith in the institutions of criminal justice themselves, yet relatively little ongoing attention has been paid to the systemic and institutional dimension of the problem of wrongful convictions in Canada. The Innocence Project is designed to engage students in the important, difficult, and highly rewarding work of remedying wrongful convictions, while providing them with an opportunity to grapple with theoretical and practical questions about causes and remedies.

Incoming students have the exciting task of learning about the causes of wrongful convictions, the difficulties faced by the factually innocent and those assisting them, and the development of strategies to correct these miscarriages of justice.  Students will learn through seminars by experts and colleagues, clinical undertakings, and written work. As well, throughout the two terms, students will be required to attend regular workshops on issues relevant to the problem of wrongful conviction.  Past workshop topics have included:

  • Forensic Testing
  • The Law of Interrogation
  • The Law and Flaws of Eyewitness Identification
  • Analyzing Circumstantial Evidence
  • Professional Conduct: Crown Disclosure, Ineffective Assistance of Counsel
  • Exculpatory Evidence and Evidence of “Other Suspects”
  • Overreaching Prosecution (including evaluation of opening and closing addresses to the jury)
  • Change of Venue and Challenge for Cause
  • Jail House Confession and the Use of Informants

The core of the Program is supervised clinical work on actual cases of possible wrongful conviction. Clinical work is carried on in teams, and students are involved in case selection and work, analysis of evidence and reinvestigating findings, legal research, doctrinal work, and outreach and clinic development.  Beyond the investigative work which must be undertaken on any file, students will be required to conduct an exhaustive review of the record in the trial and appellate courts and may be involved in obtaining new forensic or DNA testing.

Evaluation

40% of the mark will come from clinic and class participation. The participation mark will be based on attendance at clinic meetings, completion and quality of written work (the majority of students are assigned a major file review or drafting assignment in the fall semester), completion and quality of practical clinic assignments (students will be assigned a number of small research and correspondence tasks), effective and consistent contribution to the administration of clinic, effective and consistent following of office procedures and docketing, professionalism, and ability to meet deadlines. In the event that more than two Friday clinic sessions are missed, appropriate documentation is required.

60% of the mark will come from a 7000-word research paper. Students will receive a final letter grade that is based on the marks obtained above. They will also receive a detailed written evaluation that will be permanently appended to their transcript.

The Innocence Project satisfies the praxicum and OPIR requirements, and the major research paper qualifies for the Upper Year Research and Writing Requirement.

Applications

Grade Report Resume/CV Cover Letter Writing Sample References Prerequisites
Y Y N N N N

Intellectual Property Law And Technology Intensive Program 

DIRECTOR Professor Giuseppina D’Agostino
CREDITS 15
SEMESTER Fall
LOCATION Various organizations
SEMINAR Two weeks
REQUIRED COURSES At least two intellectual property law related courses (i.e. Patents, Copyright, Trademarks or IP related seminar)
YEAR OF STUDY 3L
PROGRAM SIZE 12
PRAXICUM Yes
UPPER YEAR WRITING REQUIREMENT Yes
OPIR Yes
EVALUATION Graded research paper (3 credits), presentation, blog assignments and participation (3 credits), credit/no-credit reflective journal and blog, and internship performance (9 credits), written evaluation attached to transcript

The Program

The Intellectual Property Law and Technology Intensive Program provides students with training in intellectual property law (patents, trademarks, copyright, industrial designs, trade secrets, etc.), technology, computer and Internet law, privacy and other areas.  Given the rapid pace of technological advancement and innovation, now more than ever, gaining a practical understanding of intellectual property and technology law issues is especially important.  Coordinated through IP Osgoode, this unique Program gives students an academic base through seminars on a broad range of topics as well as practical experience gained in a 10-week internship in a workplace setting.

The first two weeks of classes feature seminars and lectures from prominent members of the IP community.  The seminars cover a range of topics aimed at teaching fundamental aspects of substantive and procedural law applied in the day-to-day practice of IP law.  Students are also expected to participate in a variety of IP Osgoode events and projects as coordinated by the Director of the Program.

A key component of this Program includes a 10-week placement with a government agency, public interest group, industry or other organization that is heavily involved with IP matters (e.g.  a media and entertainment, high-technology or pharmaceutical company).  The internship, together with seminars, research papers, discussion sessions and blogging exercises, provides students with a comprehensive examination of important practical aspects of intellectual property and technology law.

Past Placements

  • AstraZeneca Canada Inc. is a global innovation-driven biopharmaceutical company specializing in the discovery, development, manufacturing, and marketing of prescription medicines that make a meaningful difference in healthcare;
  • The Copyright Policy Branch of the Department of Canadian Heritage, in co-operation with Intellectual Property Policy Directorate of ISED, is a department of the Government of Canada responsible for formulating and implementing an integrated Canadian copyright policy;
  • Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO), is a Special Operating Agency associated with Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada that is responsible for the administration and processing of intellectual property rights in Canada;
  • The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation is a Canadian Crown corporation that serves as the national public radio, television and digital broadcaster;
  • The Copyright and International Intellectual Property Policy Directorate is part of the Marketplace Framework Policy Branch that advises the Minister of Innovation, Science, and Economic Development Canada and senior departmental officials on copyright and international intellectual property matters and develops specific policy proposals and legislative initiatives in these areas;
  • CodeX at the Stanford Center for Legal Informatics, is a multidisciplinary laboratory operated by Stanford University in association with organizations from industry, government, and academia;
  • The Globe and Mail is a news media company with one of the largest circulations in Canada;
  • Janssen Inc., Johnson and Johnson, is a pharmaceutical company and innovator in the Canadian healthcare industry for over 50 years;
  • The Society of Composers, Authors and Music Publishers of Canada, is a Canadian copyright collective that administers the performing rights of more than 100,000 composer, author, and music publisher members by licensing the use of their music in Canada;
  • TEVA Canada Limited is part of TEVA Pharmaceuticals Industries Ltd., the world’s largest generic pharmaceutical company. TEVA Canada develops, produces, and markets generic pharmaceuticals.
  • TVO is Ontario’s public educational media organization and a trusted source of interactive educational content the informs, inspires and stimulates curiosity and thought; and
  • ventureLAB is an innovation hub that supports entrepreneurs building scalable tech businesses.  ventureLAB is also the Creative Directors for the IBM Innovation Space – Markham Convergence Centre inside the IBM Canada Headquarters.

For more information, visit their website.

Grading

This 15-credit program will run in the Fall Term.

  • The major research paper proposal (3 pages) with a short presentation and the major research paper (30 pages) are letter graded for a total of 3 credits.
  • The seminar presentation supplemented with visual aids/handouts, 2 research-based short papers to be published in blog format (1 blog post, max of 750 words and 1 blog comment, max of 250 words), class seminar leader, and class participation are letter graded for a total of 3 credits.
  • The internship reflective journal, internship reflective blog, and performance at the internship are assessed on a pass/fail basis for a total of 9 credits.

The Program Director will also prepare a written evaluation report for each student with respect to the student’s performance in each aspect of the program (taking into account comments from the internship placement supervisor), which will then be attached to the student’s transcript.

Applications

Grade Report Resume/CV Cover Letter Blog Sample References Prerequisites
Y Y Y Y N Y

Intensive Program in Indigenous Lands, Resources And Governments

DIRECTORS Professors Amar Bhatia and Jeffery G. Hewitt
CREDITS 15
SEMESTER Winter
LOCATION Placements in Canada and abroad
SEMINAR Bookended around placements
REQUIRED COURSES Indigenous Peoples and Canadian Laws, or another foundational course; a course on environmental law is required for students placed in environmental organizations
RECOMMENDED Dependent on the nature of the placement (i.e. constitutional law, criminal law)
YEAR OF STUDY 3Ls preferred
PROGRAM SIZE 10-15 students
PRAXICUM Yes
WRITING REQUIREMENT Yes
OPIR Yes
EVALUATION Two graded research papers (3 credits each), credit/no-credit clinical work (9 credits), written evaluation attached to transcript

The Program

Osgoode’s Intensive Program in Aboriginal Lands, Resources and Governments explores the legal issues relating to Indigenous peoples and Indigenous rights.  Founded in the aftermath of the “Oka crisis” (Kanesatake), the Program combines a rigorous academic experience with challenging placements in Indigenous, Aboriginal or environmental law.  This course will be of particular interest to students interested in Aboriginal and Indigenous law, environmental law, constitutional law, and public policy.

The term begins and ends with independent study and intensive seminars at Osgoode, where students are taught how to use law in creative ways to solve problems.  Thinking about how to identify, interpret, and apply Indigenous laws, as well as the rules and legislation developed by First Nations themselves, is at the heart of the community lawyering approach taken throughout the Program.

Students spend the bulk of the term in their clinical field placements.  Examples of placement work include land claims research, analyzing new legislation, assistance in preparation for litigation, attending negotiation sessions, making presentations to Chief and Council, and accompanying Crown attorneys on a fly-in circuit court.  There are a limited number of placements outside of Canada, which in the recent past have included organizations based in Latin America and the United States.

The Program aims to:

  • Produce a new generation of Indigenous and non-Indigenous lawyers better able to address issues related to the partnership of Indigenous peoples in confederation;
  • Provide a clinical legal education program with multi-disciplinary and inter-disciplinary features;
  • Provide accurate descriptions of current negotiations on Aboriginal lands, resources and governments;
  • Provide opportunities to acquire practical skills and theoretical frameworks on how to address legal issues relating to Indigenous peoples in a more open and creative way; and
  • Give greater emphasis to historical, economic, cultural, linguistic and spiritual differences in the law, which are not satisfactorily addressed in many conventional law school classes.

Because of the challenging nature of the placements, the Program is designed for students in the last term of their third year of law school, although second year students are occasionally permitted.  Both Indigenous and non-Indigenous students are eligible, but normally half of the students accepted will be Indigenous.

Course Information

The program runs from the first week of January for 13 weeks to the end of the Winter term as set out by the Osgoode administration. The schedule will likely be as follows:

  • Week 1
    • Research and writing week – preparation of memo and case content
  • Week 2 & 3
    • Classroom preparation at Osgoode Hall Law School
  • Weeks 4 – 10
    • Field placement (daily journal and weekly Facebook post)
  • Week 11
    • Study Week – preparation of papers
  • Week 12 & 13
    • Seminars at Osgoode Hall Law School
    • First paper and seminar presentation
    • Daily journal due
  • Final Date Final research paper due

Attendance at classes in Toronto is compulsory for weeks 2 & 3 and weeks 12 & 13. The seven-week placement can be anywhere, subject to the availability of a suitable placement, and availability of funding. Dates may be adjusted if necessary.

Placements

The directors of the program work with each student to make every effort to facilitate placement in a setting matching the interests and skills of the student. The directors carry out the detailed arrangement of the placement itself, but students often make their own contacts. Some students come into the program with very definite ideas about what they would like to be exposed to in their placement, while others only have very general notions about what might be educational and worthwhile. The availability of the placements may be constrained by the funding available. The directors make final decisions on placements. Where an appropriate placement cannot be found, a student may not be able to continue in the program.

Costs

The program makes every attempt to ensure that students participating in the program do not incur any major costs beyond what they would normally have to pay to attend a term at law school. Transportation to and from the placement (if required) is provided. At least part of the accommodation while on the placement is also covered within the limits of the program’s ability. The program requests that students do all they can to keep costs low, assisting in arranging reasonable transportation and accommodations. Depending on funding and placement locations, students may be asked to contribute to placement costs outside of Toronto.

Expectations

Our expectations include: being respectful, ethical, professional, open-minded, collegial, abiding by host organization policies, being interested in furthering the host organization’s goals, being able to work both independently and collectively, seeking out and being responsive to supervision, and being willing to function in a dynamic and changing environment. Very rarely, problems have arisen due to failure to attend classes or complete assignments prior to placements as well as within placements. Any issues should be raised with the Co-Directors in advance or immediately (where relevant) so that every effort can be made to resolve any difficulties.

Examples of Past Placements

Canada International
Assembly of First Nations

Centre for Indigenous Sovereignty

Chiefs of Ontario

Chippewas of the Nawash

Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations (fka)

Grand Council of the Crees of Quebec

Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami

Keewaytinok Native Legal Services

Mississaugas of New Credit First Nation

Nipissing First Nation

Nisga’a Nation (Lisims Governments)

Ontario Federation of Indian Friendship Centres

Six Nations of the Grand River

The Confederacy of Mainland Micmacs

Cape York Land Council, Australia

CEDARENA, Costa Rica

CEPPAS-GAJAT, Argentina

FAIRA Aboriginal Corporation, Australia

First Nation Development Institute, Africa

First Nation Development Institute, USA

Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, USA

Kawau Ltd., New Zealand

Land Claims Court, South Africa

Maya Leaders Alliance, Belize

New South Wales Native Title Services, Australia

Queensland Conservation Council, Australia

Waitangi Tribunal, New Zealand

Yomba Shoshone, Nevada

Firms and Judiciary Public Institutions and Organizations
Aboriginal Legal Services, Toronto

Devlin Gailus Watson Law, Victoria

Gowlings (Constance Marlatt)

Madam Justice Rose Boyko, Toronto

Murray Klippenstein, Toronto

Morris/Rose/Ledgett (Nancy Kleer), Toronto

Roberts & Stahl, Vancouver

Ruby and Edwardth (Rick Salter), Toronto

Susan Hare, West Bay, Manitoulin Island

West Coast Environmental Law, Vancouver

Brant Children’s Aid Society

British Columbia Treaty Commission

Canadian Environmental Law Association

Crown Attorney’s Office

Department of Justice Canada

Elgin Oxford Legal Clinic

Indian Claims Commission, Ottawa

Indian Commission of Ontario, Toronto

Nunavut Department of Justice, Iqaluit

Yukon Department of Justice

Applications

Grade Report Resume/CV Cover Letter Writing Sample References Prerequisites
Y Y N Y N Y

Intensive Program in Criminal Law

DIRECTORS Adjunct Professor Jonathan Rosenthal and Justice Enzo Rondinelli
CREDITS 15
SEMESTER Winter
LOCATION Placements with defence counsel, crown attorneys, or at Ontario Court of Justice
SEMINAR Weekly
REQUIRED COURSES Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure, Evidence
YEAR OF STUDY 2L and 3L
PROGRAM SIZE 20 students
PRAXICUM Yes
UPPER YEAR WRITING REQUIREMENT Yes
OPIR Yes
EVALUATION Graded paper (3 credits), credit/no-credit seminar (3 credits) and clinical work (9 credits), written evaluation attached to transcript

The Program

The Intensive Program in Criminal Law immerses students in the criminal law adjudicatory process.  The Program is an externship designed to bridge the divide between the student’s understanding of criminal law and procedure in theory, gained through classroom instruction, and the realities of how the criminal justice system operates in fact.  Students are exposed to a wide variety of experiences through lectures delivered by leading experts, visits to correctional facilities, and a 10-week placement.

Students attend lectures, seminars, and discussion sessions coordinated by the Directors of the Program and specially invited guests currently employed within the criminal justice system.  The first two weeks of the semester involve a series of lectures which focus on how substantive, procedural, and evidentiary law is actually applied in the day-to-day operation of the criminal courts.  Prominent members of the legal and forensic science communities attend to lecture on an array of topics, such as DNA evidence, cross-examining witnesses, drinking and driving, forensic psychiatry, special diversion courts, plea bargaining, and judicial perspectives on advocacy.

Following this, students participate in a 10-week placement with a specially selected member of the judiciary, Crown counsel, or defence counsel.  The placement allows students to both observe and become involved in the criminal process in action.  Students are exposed to every element of the process from initial client interview to sentencing and appeal.  Each Friday, students return to Osgoode where their classmates present on selected topics in criminal law. Additionally, students are required to keep a reflective journal, and conduct a mock trial where they act as either the prosecution or the defence before judges at the Ontario Court of Justice. Placement supervisors will report in writing on students placed with them.

The Program concludes with visits to the Forensic Science and Forensic Pathology Laboratories, a provincial correctional centre, a federal penitentiary, a mental health treatment facility, and various specialty courts.  Other components of the Program include:

  • Using a mock trial file to review various stages of the criminal trial process
  • Attending the Centre of Forensic Sciences and the Coroner’s Office to receive instruction in scientific evidence and pathology
  • Visiting a federal penitentiary to obtain first hand contact with staff and inmates
  • Visiting mental health treatment facilities and learning about the intersection of criminal and mental health law
  • Attending at specialty courts such as Youth Court and the Court of Appeal for introduction and discussion about their particular roles within the criminal justice system

Examples of Past Placements

Defence Firms Crown Attorney’s Offices Ontario Court of Justice
Adler, Bytensky, Prutschi and Shikhman

Leiper, Liva, Parker

Pringle and Bottomley

Hicks Adams LLP

Greenspan Partners

Schreck Presser LLP

Downtown Toronto

Toronto East – Scarborough

Toronto North – 1000 Finch

Toronto West – 2201 Finch

Newmarket

Brampton

Crown Law Office Criminal

Old City Hall

Newmarket

Brampton

College Park

1000 Finch Avenue

Scarborough

 

Requirements

  1. Two papers written for academic credit grades on topics approved by the Director within the field of:
    1. criminal evidence and procedure, or
    2. the administration of criminal justice and substantive criminal law
  2. One seminar presentation from a selection of twenty major areas of criminal justice activity contained in the course book. The Director gives the seminar leaders a written assessment of each seminar undertaken. Students also attend lectures, seminars and discussion sessions coordinated by the Director of the program and specially invited guests currently employed within the criminal justice system. In the opening sessions, particular emphasis is placed on interviewing, negotiating, examining and cross-examining witnesses, entering exhibits and making procedural, evidential and sentencing submissions to the Bench.
  3. A ten-week placement with a specially selected member of the judiciary at the Ontario Court General Division, Ontario Court Provincial Division, with Crown Counsel, or with Defence Counsel. During these placements students are exposed to every element of the process from initial client interview to sentencing and appeal. Students make weekly written reports on their activities and reflections and placement personnel report in writing on students placed with them.
  4. Visit the Forensic Science Laboratory and Forensic Pathology in order to provide practical experience in forensic science and pathology; Visit a provincial correctional centre and a federal penitentiary to obtain first hand contact with staff and inmates; Be instructed by specialists in the operation of the polygraph and the breathalyzer to keep up with advances in technology; Spend a day in the Ride-Along Program driving in a police squad car.
  5. Item (1) is letter graded and items (2) to (4) are on a pass/fail basis.
  6. At the conclusion of the semester the Director supplies each student with a written evaluation of each aspect of the student’s performance in the course

Applications

Grade Report Resume/CV Cover Letter Writing Sample References Prerequisites
Y Y N N N Y

Intensive Program In Immigration And Refugee Law

DIRECTOR Adjunct Professor Sasha Baglay
CREDITS 15
SEMESTER Winter
LOCATION Osgoode Hall Law School and placements
SEMINAR Bookended around placements
REQUIRED COURSES Immigration Law, Refugee Law
RECOMMENDED Administrative Law
YEAR OF STUDY 2L and 3L
PROGRAM SIZE 15 students
PRAXICUM Yes
UPPER YEAR WRITING REQUIREMENT Yes
OPIR Yes
EVALUATION Graded research paper (3 credits), immigration module (4 credits), and refugee module (4 credits), credit/no-credit placement (4 credits), written evaluation attached to transcript

**Note: This Program is typically offered in alternate years**

The Program

Established in 1990, the Intensive Program in Immigration and Refugee Law was the first Program of its kind in a Canadian law school.  The Program exposes students to a challenging combination of a clinical placement, hands-on simulations, seminars, and supervised research work that reflect on contemporary issues of Canadian and international immigration/refugee law.  The objective is to assist students to critically assess the underlying tenets of this rapidly evolving body of public law, and the roles that lawyers play in the design, application and development of immigration and refugee law.

The Program begins with one week of seminars introducing the major themes, history and international context of refugee and immigration law followed by sessions in advanced immigration and refugee law.  The first two modules, Advanced Immigration Law and Advanced Refugee Law, each consist of two weeks of seminars that consider specialized topics in domestic and international law.  Students also benefit from exposure to various guest speakers (practitioners and academics) who discuss selected issues of law and practice.

The third module is a 6-week external placement.  The external placements are a major component of the Program.  Students are placed with mentors in advocacy, institutional and adjudicative settings.  The goal of the placements is to advance the student’s understanding of immigration and refugee law from the perspective of advocates, policy officials and decision-makers and to allow students to apply the knowledge they have gained in the areas of immigration and refugee law.

Following the external placement, students return for the concluding weeks of the Program.  The students have an opportunity to share and discuss their placement experiences and to complete a major research paper on a chosen topic of immigration or refugee law.

Examples of Past Placements

  • Federal Court of Canada
  • UNHCR
  • Immigration and Refugee Board
  • Green and Spiegel
  • Jackman Nazami & Associates
  • Lorne Waldman & Associate
  • Mamann Sandaluk Kingwell LLP
  • Guberman Garson LLP
  • Desloges Law Group
  • Patricia Wells and Associates
  • Raoul Boulakia
  • Refugee Law Office
  • Department of Justice

Applications

Grade Report Resume/CV Cover Letter Writing Sample References Prerequisites
Y Y N N N Y

Intensive Program in Poverty Law At Parkdale Community Legal Services

DIRECTOR Professor Adrian Smith
CREDITS 15
SEMESTER Fall or Winter
LOCATION Parkdale Community Legal Services
SEMINAR Weekly
REQUIRED COURSES None
YEAR OF STUDY 2L and 3L
PROGRAM SIZE 40 students
PRAXICUM Yes
UPPER YEAR WRITING REQUIREMENT Yes
OPIR Yes
EVALUATION Graded seminar (3 credits), credit/no-credit clinical work (12 credits), written evaluation attached to transcript

The Program

Established in 1971, Parkdale Community Legal Services (PCLS) is a cornerstone of the law school’s social justice tradition.  Osgoode students were instrumental in establishing the Clinic and remain integral to its operation.  As the first community-based legal aid clinic in Ontario, PCLS is widely recognized as one of Osgoode’s proudest achievements.  The Intensive Program in Poverty Law places 20 students for a semester at the Clinic, located in the vibrant community of Parkdale in downtown Toronto.  The Program is a full-time, full-term commitment which promises to provide an enriching and challenging experience.  Students are assigned to one of four divisions: Housing Rights, Workers’ Rights, Social Assistance, Violence and Health (SAVAH), or Immigration.  As the front-line faces of the Clinic, students conduct initial intake and have hands-on responsibility for developing cases and legal arguments, carrying a caseload of approximately 15 active files.  There are daily opportunities to learn and develop skills in interviewing, counseling and negotiating, as well as offering summary advice and making referrals to appropriate agencies or services.  Students periodically represent clients at hearings before administrative tribunals.

Recognizing that Parkdale community members encounter challenges of a systemic nature, PCLS embraces a model of community lawyering that integrates strategies designed to redress individual legal problems with those designed to facilitate broader systemic change.  PCLS works with low-income people in the community to identify and tackle these issues and challenges.  Students participate in all dimensions of the Clinic’s work, engaging daily with the practices of community-based lawyering including public legal education, community organizing and development, coalition building, and media strategizing.

The Poverty Law Intensive aims to provide students with an understanding of the social phenomenon of poverty, including its causes and impacts, and a critical analysis of legal responses to poverty.  Through the weekly seminar and other regular learning sessions, students are taught to rigorously evaluate: (a) law’s role in reproducing and contesting poverty; (b) various models of poverty law practice and wider social justice advocacy; and, (c) the work of PCLS in light of different theories of social change.  Criteria for selection include interest in working for social justice in a poverty law context, ability to work collaboratively and to take instructions, patience and respect for community members, equity, law school marks, and program/year of study.  If accepted into the Program, you will join a distinguished group of some 1,700 alumni including practising lawyers, law professors, judges and politicians.

For more information, visit their website.

Applications

Grade Report Resume/CV Cover Letter Writing Sample References Prerequisites
Y Y N Y Y N

Investor Protection Clinic 

DIRECTOR Professor Poonam Puri and Adjunct Professor Brigitte Catellier
CREDITS 9
SEMESTER Full year
LOCATION Osgoode Hall Law School and FAIR Canada Investor Protection Clinic
SEMINAR Monthly
REQUIRED COURSES Business Associations and Securities Regulation (can be taken concurrently)
YEAR OF STUDY 2L and 3L
PROGRAM SIZE 12-14 students
PRAXICUM Yes
UPPER YEAR WRITING REQUIREMENT Yes
OPIR Yes
EVALUATION Graded seminar, small assignments, and essay (3 credits), credit/no-credit clinical work (6 credits), written evaluation attached to transcript

The Program

Where do individual investors turn after suffering a loss, harm or wrongdoing with respect to their investments?  The Investor Protection Clinic (IPC), the first of its kind in Canada, provides pro-bono legal assistance to people in Ontario who have invested their savings and suffered an investment loss but cannot afford to hire a lawyer to help them.  In this full year Program, students develop specialized, advanced and critical knowledge of investor protection issues, investor recovery mechanisms and gaps in the current system through a program that integrates scholarly perspectives, skills development and reflective practice.

A joint initiative of Osgoode Hall Law School and FAIR Canada, IPC provides an opportunity for students to obtain clinical experience in the field of corporate and securities law.  IPC consists of a Clinic that provides students the opportunity to grapple with real-life problems and issues of harmed individual investors, and an Academic Seminar that facilitates the integration of reflection and practice, building upon work being undertaken by students at the Clinic and providing a more conceptual framework for their practical day-to-day work.  Students thereby gain a deeper appreciation of what it means to protect individual investors in the Canadian capital markets.

The Clinic begins with a training program to prepare students for the breadth and depth of issues that they may encounter at the Clinic.  Students will work closely with their supervising lawyers to interview potential clients, suggest legal options to clients, draft documents (including complaint letters), assist clients with OmbudService resolution processes, facilitate mediation and arbitration procedures and/or assist with court hearings.  The Clinic will receive referrals from government, regulators and law firms; harmed investors will also be able to contact the Clinic directly.

The Academic Seminar provides a critical understanding of the theory, policy, nature and design of the investor protection framework in the Canadian legal and regulatory landscape.  Students will develop perspectives from which to understand, critically assess and think constructively about what investor protection means as a dynamic social, economic and political construct.  Students will be encouraged to consider the competing and complimentary nature of public regulatory mechanisms, private civil lawsuits through the courts, self-regulatory mechanisms including mediation and arbitration, and corporations’ internal complaints mechanisms.  Students will be encouraged to explore the challenges and gaps in the current framework of investor protection.

Topics to be covered include:

  • History and development of the investor protection mandate;
  • Current debates on deterrence versus investor compensation and recovery;
  • Efficacy of current investor recovery procedures, their policy rationales and where they leave gaps or fall short;
  • Innovative mechanisms on the horizon in Canada and other jurisdictions;
  • Reflective practice (praxis) in the context of investor protection; and
  • The potential and limits of the utilization of corporate law, securities law, contract law and fiduciary duties in the quest for better investor protection outcomes.

It is difficult for Canadians to navigate the various investment complaint/redress processes on their own.  The clinic fills a gap by offering investors who believe they have been harmed access to a single point of contact that we can provide them with comprehensive assistance or advices on how to proceed, regardless of what type of investment they are concerned with or which regulatory body oversees that investment and the firm and representative who made the recommendation.

The Investor Protection Clinic (IPC) consists of two closely integrated components:

  • The Clinic. Housed at Osgoode Hall Law School, the clinic will offer students the opportunity to grapple with difficult and complex legal issues relating to investor protection and investor recovery (such as through litigation, mediation and arbitration procedures, investor education outreach, and so on); and
  • An Academic Seminar. Students will develop specialized, advanced and critical knowledge of investor protection issues in an academic program that integrates scholarly perspectives, skills development and reflective practice.  It also enables students to develop skills in dispute resolution, negotiation, oral and written advocacy and legal research and writing.

Clinic (6 Credits, Credit/No Credit): The IPC will require participation during the entirety of the academic year.  The Clinic will begin with a training program, which will prepare students for the breadth and depth of issues that they may encounter at the Clinic. It will include an overview of: (i) Key types of investments and investment products; (ii) The range of issues that may arise (misappropriated funds, fraud, unsuitable investment recommendations, unsuitable recommendations to borrow to invest, non-disclosure of fees, churning, inappropriate advice, unauthorized trading, misrepresentation, corporate oppression, and so on); (iii) Key mechanisms available (court, mediation, arbitration, regulatory complaints, ombudservices, criminal complaints, and internal corporate complaints processes) as well as procedural aspects for each; and (iv) Client intake skills.

This skills training will provide a foundation for students to commence at the Clinic and there will be regular group and one-on-one meetings with the Academic Director as well as ongoing supervision by lawyers from the supervising law firm.

Students will work closely with their supervising lawyers to interview potential clients, suggest legal options to clients, draft documents (including complaint letters), assist clients with ombudsservice resolution processes, facilitate mediation and arbitration procedures and/or assist with court hearings. Bennett Jones LLP, Baker McKenzie, Groia & Company, Koskie Minsky LLP, Siskinds LLP, Rochon Genova LLP, Tyr LLP and Crawley, and McKewn Brush LLP have agreed to act as supervising law firms. The Clinic will benefit from multiple firms being involved as it increases the Clinic’s capacity and reduce the potential for legal conflicts.

Academic Seminar (3 Credits, Graded):  The Academic Seminar provides a critical understanding of the theory, policy, nature and design of the investor protection framework in the Canadian legal and regulatory landscape.  Students will develop perspectives from which to understand, critically assess and think constructively about what investor protection means as a dynamic social, economic and political construct.  Students will be encouraged to consider the competing and complimentary nature of public regulatory mechanisms, private civil lawsuits through the courts, self-regulatory mechanisms including mediation and arbitration, and corporations’ internal complaints mechanisms. Students will be encouraged to explore the challenges and gaps in the current framework of investor protection. Topics to be covered include: (i) History and development of the investor protection mandate; (ii) Current debates on deterrence versus investor compensation and recovery; (iii) Efficacy of current investor recovery procedures, their policy rationales and where they leave gaps or fall short; (iv) Innovative mechanisms on the horizon in Canada and other jurisdictions; (v) Reflective practice (praxis) in the context of investor protection; (vi) the potential and limits of the utilization of corporate law, securities law, contract law and fiduciary duties in the quest for better investor protection outcomes.

Evaluation in the Seminar is based on attendance, class participation, discussions on the readings, written commentaries integrating reflection on work and academic perspectives, student presentations, and a research paper.  The research paper will require approval of topic, submission of an outline and draft bibliography, and submission of a final paper/final bibliography that makes an original scholarly contribution to the literature.

Why Is Investor Protection Necessary?

This clinical program will require students to deeply appreciate and analyze critical legal issues from the perspective of harmed investors to determine how best to protect them through remedies (court-based, arbitration, mediation, ombudsservices, etc.) after they have been harmed. While many Canadians invest, they often lack the financial literacy and knowledge to protect themselves in a complex investment landscape. Individual investors who believe they have been wronged or suffered a loss deserve a single point of contact that can offer them comprehensive assistance with their investment complaint. There is currently nowhere in Canada for investors to go to after suffering a loss, and many investors in these circumstances may not be able to take on the additional expense of legal advice in order to pursue a claim. As the first clinic of its kind in Canada, the IPC will seek to help investors navigate the ombudsman process, civil litigation, SRO arbitration or other regulatory processes to recover their losses. In short, our goal is to help provide better recourse for aggrieved investors and help facilitate access to justice.

Eligibility and Requirements

The program is open to second or third year students at Osgoode in good academic standing who will have completed Business Associations and Securities Regulation by the end of the upcoming winter term. Twelve to fourteen (12-14) spaces in this program are open to students.

Applications

Grade Report Resume/CV Cover Letter Writing Sample References Prerequisites
Y Y Y N N Y

International and Transnational Law Intensive Program 

DIRECTORS Professor Craig Scott and Adjunct Professor Geraldine Sadoway
CREDITS 15
SEMESTER Winter
LOCATION International organizations or Canadian NGOs and legal clinics
SEMINAR Weekly
REQUIRED COURSES Public International Law
RECOMMENDED If there are courses offered in the Fall semester that relate closely to an upcoming placement, the Directors may encourage students to take one or more
YEAR OF STUDY 2L and 3L
PROGRAM SIZE 15 students
PRAXICUM Yes
UPPER YEAR WRITING REQUIREMENT Yes
OPIR Yes
EVALUATION Graded seminar (2 credits) and research paper (3 credits), credit/no-credit clinical work (10 credits), written evaluation attached to transcript

The Program

Established in 2016, the International and Transnational Law Intensive Program (ITLIP) places students with a variety of partner organizations at the same time as students engage in parallel academic work.  The goal is for students to develop specialized, advanced and critical knowledge of international and transnational law both through study and through exposure to the workings of the law in a program that integrates scholarly inquiry, skills development, and reflective practice.

ITLIP students are placed in either an intergovernmental organization located in Canada or abroad, or a law clinic, non-governmental organization, or law firm in Canada that grapples in a significant way with international or transnational law questions/issues (such as through litigation, legislative change, and other advocacy).  Students will be engaged in providing international legal and related services to these organizations and any clients they might have.  To different degrees depending on their placement, ITLIP enables students to develop skills related to dispute resolution, handling ethical dilemmas, collaborative/team work, work-flow and time management, international law implementation processes (both at international and national/local levels), research and writing, and policy development and advocacy.

Although students will be dispersed in various locations across Canada and around the world, technology is used to unite the students in sharing their experiences, reflecting and discussing through a weekly online academic seminar that involves both video-conferencing and postings on the course website.  Seminar meetings provide an understanding of the nature, design, work and impact of international and transnational law and of international and non-governmental organizations as a set of dynamic social institutions rooted in history and unequal power relations.  General themes include:

  • The history and purposes of international law and international organizations including various critical approaches to international law;
  • Innovative ways of utilizing international law and organizations in domestic courts, legislatures, public discourse, community organizing, and other local settings, in the service of social change;
  • Reflective practice (praxis) in the context of international law and organizations including on the potential and limits of international law and organizations, and of their utilization in the service of the struggle for global and/or local social change;
  • The nature of “transnational law” and lawyering, and their relationship to public international law.

Examples of Past Placements

Canada International
Amnesty International (Ottawa)

The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (Ottawa)

Government of Canada Trade Law Bureau in Global Affairs (Ottawa)

Refugee Law Office (Toronto)

The Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, Anti-Discrimination Division (Geneva)

The Mechanism for the International Criminal Tribunals (The Hague and Arusha)

UNICEF (Bangkok)

Applications

Grade Report Resume/CV Cover Letter Writing Sample References Prerequisites
Y Y N Y N Y

Osgoode Mediation Clinical Program

DIRECTORS Professor Martha Simmons
CREDITS 9
SEMESTER Full Year
LOCATION Osgoode Hall Law School
SEMINAR Weekly
REQUIRED COURSES None
YEAR OF STUDY 2L and 3L
PROGRAM SIZE 20 students
PRAXICUM Yes
UPPER YEAR WRITING REQUIREMENT Yes
OPIR Yes
EVALUATION Graded research paper, class participation, clinic work product, and simulated mediation (4 credits), credit/no-credit clinical work (5 credits), written evaluation attached to transcript

The Program

Mediation is an alternative dispute resolution process, which utilizes a third party (the mediator) to assist parties in reaching a mutually acceptable resolution to their problem.  The mediator, through a facilitated conversation, assists parties to communicate more effectively, uncover their interests, and generate creative options to resolve their dispute.  The skill developed through the Mediation Clinical Program will be invaluable to students’ future practice, whether they play the role of mediator, lawyer, or simply wish to acquire improved conflict resolution skills.

This full-year program bridges mediation theory and practice, while actively engaging students in the provision of conflict resolution services through the Osgoode Mediation Clinic.  Students learn the theory that underlies mediation as well as the skills needed to actually mediate conflicts.  Under the guidance and direction of the Mediation Clinic Director, students also engage in a variety of mediation services including undertaking community outreach, facilitating dispute resolution workshops, and conducting community and Small Claims Court mediations. For their clinic work, students are divided into one of three divisions: Clinic/Campus, St. Stephen’s, Youth/Family. Students remain in the same division throughout the year and work with both the Clinic Director and community partners in fulfilling their clinic work.

Students participate in a weekly three-hour seminar that focuses on class discussion of the recent dispute resolution literature, including the utility of mediation in civil and criminal disputes, mediation advocacy, access to justice, community mediation issues, as well as cultural, power, ethical and professional responsibility issues in alternative dispute resolution and principles of dispute system design.  The seminar includes a major research paper addressing one or more theoretical issues with observations based on the students’ practice experience.

Applications

Grade Report Resume/CV Cover Letter Writing Sample References Prerequisites
Y Y N N N N

Osgoode Business Clinic

DIRECTORS Professor Stephanie Ben-Ishai
CREDITS  7
SEMESTER Full Year
LOCATION Osgoode Hall Law School and Stikeman Elliott LLP
SEMINAR Case Studies in Business Enterprises
REQUIRED COURSES Business Associations (can be taken concurrently)
YEAR OF STUDY 2L and 3L
PROGRAM SIZE 22 students
PRAXICUM Yes
UPPER YEAR WRITING REQUIREMENT Yes
OPIR Yes
EVALUATION Credit/no-credit clinic work (2 credits per term) and seminar (3 graded credits), written evaluation attached to transcript

The Program

The Osgoode Business Clinic (OBC) provides students with practical legal skills to assist individuals starting small business enterprises.  Each year OBC provides advice to, and prepares legal documentation for, a small number of clients who are establishing and operating a small business enterprise.  OBC Students will also act as mentors to first-year students who volunteer to participate in the OBC.

The objectives of OBC are to provide a limited number of Osgoode students with an opportunity to complement their studies in business law and related areas by engaging in clinical casework under the expert supervision of legal practitioners; and to provide basic legal information and advice to a limited number of persons who are in the process of starting or operating their small business enterprise and could not otherwise afford to obtain professional legal services.  The objective is to fuse students’ doctrinal education in commercial law with experiential training thereby providing a holistic educative experience.  The files typically involve providing basic but typical legal advice and documents (i.e.  incorporation, drafting sales contracts, subcontracts). The clients cannot otherwise afford professional legal services but are attempting to start up or raise the sophistication of their small company or sole proprietor business practices.

Students work in teams of 2-3, and the law firm of Stikeman Elliott LLP will supervise students in the provision of legal advice to clients.  Stikeman Elliott lawyers will not meet with clients directly.  All client interviews and meetings will be conducted on a timely basis by students, who will report to a team of lawyers assigned by Stikeman Elliott to supervise the client file in question.  Stikeman Elliott will supervise and review all legal work done by OBC students on client files and will approve such work before any legal advice is provided to clients.

Eligibility and Requirements

  1. OBC Students will also act as mentors to first-year students who volunteer to participate in the OBC.
  2. Number of contact hours:
    1. Files: approximately 20 hours per semester for two semesters;
    2. Meeting with supervising counsel: approximately 6 hours per semester for two semesters;
    3. Meeting with Course Director: approximately 6 hours per semester for two semesters.
    4. 2 class hours per week throughout the Fall Semester.
  3. Some clinical sessions (3 per year) will be held at the Toronto Office of Stikeman Elliott, as will meetings between caseworkers and supervising counsel. Meetings with the Course Director will take place at Osgoode.
  4. Students will receive 2 credits per term as a pass/fail grade.
  5. Participation in OBC is by permission of the Course Director. Students participating in OBC must register in the course for the Fall and Winter semesters.
  6. Students in OBC MUST enrol in Case Studies in Business Enterprises concurrently with OBC.

The Case Studies in Business Enterprises seminar explores substantive law issues commonly encountered in the creation and operation of small business enterprises, and related business topics.  This seminar provides students with an understanding of the legal framework for the establishment and growth of small business enterprises; explores legal and business issues encountered in the course of creating and operating such enterprises; and provides students with a foundation of business law skills.  The seminar offers in-class instruction concerning the substantive law impacting small business enterprises.  In addition to class discussion, students will engage in role-play and simulated exercises, both in-class and on Osgoode’s intranet, and work in small groups to explore legal and business issues encountered by small business clients.  Seminar topics may include:

  • The small business context;
  • Advising the small business, and professional responsibility;
  • Financing the business, including overview of business plans, small business accounting, financial statements, tax;
  • Regulatory environment;
  • Agency and partnerships;
  • Joint ventures;
  • Governance issues;
  • Employers and employees;
  • Intellectual property issues;
  • Succession;
  • Purchase and sale of a small business; and
  • Advising the failing business.

Students in the Case Studies in Business Enterprises seminar will receive a letter grade for a combination of assignments (2 x 10%), participation (20%) and research paper (60%).

Applications

Grade Report Resume/CV Cover Letter Writing Sample References Prerequisites
Y Y Y N N Y

Test Case Litigation Project

DIRECTORS TBD
CREDITS 9
SEMESTER Full year
LOCATION Osgoode Hall Law School, and with leading practitioners
SEMINAR Fall
REQUIRED COURSES None
YEAR OF STUDY 2L and 3L
PROGRAM SIZE 10 students
PRAXICUM Yes
UPPER YEAR WRITING REQUIREMENT Yes
OPIR Yes
EVALUATION Graded seminar (3 credits) and research paper (3 credits), credit/no-credit work clinical work (3 credits), written evaluation attached to transcript

**Note: This Program is not offered in 2020/2021**

The Program

The Test Case Litigation Project provides Osgoode students with the chance to immerse themselves in the exciting world of test case litigation, an opportunity previously unavailable to Canadian law students. Placements with leading Canadian litigators and/or organizations will afford students unparalleled experiences in the day-to-day practice of important litigation progressing through the Canadian court system.  Students will learn about test case and appellate litigation while being exposed to numerous leading litigators in the Canadian legal system, as well honing critical research, writing, and oral advocacy skills.  The Test Case Litigation Project provides an opportunity for students to learn the theory and practice of using litigation as a tool of law reform and social change, while also gaining hands-on experience assisting practitioners engaged in actual test cases.

The Fall seminar covers cross-cutting issues relevant to test case litigation, including justiciability, standing, jurisdiction, interventions, funding, and ethical issues.  The class is largely discussion based, with periodic short assignments that require students to apply the material discussed in class to a hypothetical test case.  The seminar is designed to expose students to both the theory behind using litigation as a social change strategy, as well as introduce them to the major practical considerations involved in conducting a test case.  Students will benefit from the experiences of guest lecturers drawn from among the leading practitioners and judges of the Canadian bar.  Additionally, students will have the opportunity to participate in a mooting exercise, and to travel to court to observe an ongoing appellate case.

In the Winter term, students are placed with lawyers, NGOs and legal aid clinics who are engaged in ongoing test cases.  Due to the variable and complex nature of this type of litigation, students work on cases at a wide range of development, from strategic pre-litigation work through to appeals.  Students will meet with their supervisors multiple times throughout the placement, and will be responsible for research assistance, drafting projects and other assorted duties as deemed fit by the supervising lawyers.

As a means of bridging the academic and practical aspects of the Program, students will complete a research paper in the Winter semester that affords them the opportunity to reflect on their experiences in the seminar and during their placement.  Students will regularly consult the Clinic Director during the writing process; the substance of the research papers will vary according to each student’s particular interests and experiences and will include a major reflective component.

Applications

Grade Report Resume/CV Cover Letter Writing Sample References Prerequisites
Y Y N N N N