Other Osgoode Internships

Toggle secondary navigation

Barbara Betcherman Feminist Legal Internship

The Barbara Betcherman Feminist Legal Internship will support experiential education in the JD program at Osgoode and will be given to students whose experiential programs will promote initiatives and research about women and law, including goals of sex equality and the application of feminist legal theory. Recipients will be selected on the basis of the following criteria: demonstrated interest (including academic, employment or volunteer activities) in issues about women and the law, sex equality goals, and the application of feminist legal theories; a proposed project that promotes initiatives and research about women and the law, including goals of sex equality and the application of feminist legal theories; unpaid/underpaid nature of the work proposed to be undertaken; academic performance; and financial need.

Debwewin Internship

The Debwewin Internship is offered to support the initiative of students interested in providing community education and legal assistance support to First Nations, Métis or Inuit (Indigenous) communities and community organizations in Ontario. Students may develop a placement or work with the Ministry of Attorney General to do so. The student may work with the host organization and a local Indigenous community to develop a community-based justice project that relates in some way to the Iacobucci Report subject matter and findings. Students will also be responsible for working collaboratively with other internship students within this program to develop and deliver at least two public legal education workshops to Indigenous community members on the role of the jury and the importance of representative juries within the justice system within Ontario.

Preference will be given to students who have experience working with Indigenous communities and Indigenous community organizations. Recipients must demonstrate solid academic achievement.

The Harris Internship Award

These awards will be given to students registered in the Intensive Program in Aboriginal Lands, Resources, and Governments at Osgoode Hall Law School. The funds will be used to assist students with the travel costs of their internship and other costs associated with their participation in the program.

This award was donated by Milton E. Harris, Chairman and CEO of Harris Steel Group Inc.. Mr. Harris was committed to the principles identified by the Royal Commission of Aboriginal Peoples, which included educational initiatives that benefit Aboriginal people and non-Aboriginal people.

James Kreppner ’89 Memorial Internship

James Kreppner played a key role in getting compensation for thousands of people infected during Canada’s tainted blood scandal. A victim himself, he died at the age of 47. The internship is available to students who have obtained summer employment (12-16) weeks at a public interest agency, firm or organization where the focus is on advocacy, preferably in area of health law and/or patient rights. The project and/or work may involve research, policy or law reform work, or the provision of legal assistance. Preference will be given to applicants working in unpaid or underpaid settings, and applicants must demonstrate both academic excellence and financial need.

Eric and Edna Lisus Social Justice Internship

This internship pays tribute to Edna and Eric Lisus’ enduring commitment to and interest in issues of social justice and equality in their country of birth, South Africa, and their adopted home Canada. It is available to a JD student committed to the betterment of the disadvantaged in society. Preference will be given to applicants working in unpaid or underpaid settings who demonstrate academic excellence and financial need.

John Plater ’96 Memorial Internship

John Plater played a key role in getting compensation for thousands of people infected during Canada’s tainted blood scandal. A victim himself, he died at the age of 46. This internship is available to a student who has obtained summer employment (12-16 weeks) at a public interest agency, firm or organization where the focus is on advocacy, preferably in area of health law and/or patient rights. The project and/or work may involve research, policy or law reform work, or the provision of legal assistance. Preference will be given to applicants working in unpaid or underpaid settings, and applicants must demonstrate both academic excellence and financial need.

Victor Internships

The Victor Internship honours Dr. Peter Victor, an economist and former Dean of the Faculty of Environmental Studies (FES) who has worked on environmental issues for over 40 years as an academic, public servant and consultant.

They are available to students who have obtained summer employment (12-16 weeks) at a public or public interest organization such as a legal aid clinic, advocacy organization, municipal, regional or Indigenous government organization or a non-governmental organization. Preference will be given to students who are working unpaid or underpaid. Recipient(s) must demonstrate high academic achievement and financial need. If there are no eligible candidates from the JD/MES program, eligible candidates in the JD program will be considered.